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IN THE NEWS

  • ‘Treasure in saliva’ may reveal deadly diseases early enough to treat them, UCLA scientists report

    UCLA Newsroom - October 29, 2014
    UCLA research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing — at an early stage — diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases.

  • Peter Narins elected president, International Society for Neuroethology

    UCLA Newsroom - October 24, 2014
    Professor Peter Narins has been elected president of the International Society for Neuroethology, a post he will hold until 2016.

  • UCLA research could help improve bladder function among people with spinal cord injuries

    UCLA Newsroom - October 16, 2014
    New UCLA research addresses a critical health problem for those who are paralyzed

  • Discovery of heart's repair process suggests new treatment strategy for heart attack

    Health Canal - October 15, 2014
    Findings, from the lab of Dr. Arjun Deb, suggest the possibility of coaxing scar-forming cells in the heart to change their identity into blood vessel-forming cells, which could potentially be used to improve healing after a heart attack.

  • Soon to become a minority in the U.S., whites express declining support for diversity, UCLA psychology study finds

    UCLA Newsroom - October 2, 2014
    UCLA psychologists find that white Americans may view diversity and multiculturalism more negatively as the U.S. moves toward becoming a minority-majority nation.

  • UCLA faculty voice: ‘Assisted migration’ may save some species from climate change doom

    UCLA Newsroom - September 24, 2014
    Humans can help threatened species survive

  • Man-made evolution is happening, and it’s time to control it

    UCLA Newsroom - September 11, 2014
    UCLA evolutionary biologist Thomas Smith and colleagues from seven other universities explain that pests and diseases are evolving too quickly, while people and endangered species are evolving too slowly.

  • UCLA biologists delay the aging process by ‘remote control’

    UCLA Newsroom - September 8, 2014
    UCLA biologists– David Walker, Matthew Ulgherait, and colleagues– have identified a gene that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems.

  • New vaccine shows promise as stronger weapon against both tuberculosis, leprosy

    Science Daily - August 19, 2014
    The UCLA lab of Marcus A. Horwitz, has created an improved vaccine against tuberculosis that also offers cross-protection against bacterium that causes leprosy.

  • PTSD can develop even without memory of the trauma

    UCLA Newsroom - August 14, 2014
    Recent research by former UCLA post-doc Andrew Poulos (lead author), Psychology professor Michael Fanselow (senior author), and others suggests PTSD can develop without memory of the trauma.

  • How ‘jumping genes’ help black truffles adapt to their environment

    UCLA Newsroom - August 05, 2014
    A recent study carried out by an international team–including senior author, Matteo Pellegrini, UCLA life scientist– reports on the truffle’s unique genetic makeup.

  • Scientists suggest new direction for treating depression, schizophrenia, and other mental disorders

    UCLA Newsroom - July 17, 2014
    In the July 16 issue of Nature, Psychology professor Michelle Craske and her colleagues urge clinicians and neuroscientists to work together to understand and improve psychological treatments.

  • Gun violence and mental illness: Study addresses perception vs. reality

    UCLA Newsroom - June 12, 2014
    UCLA psychologist, Vickie Mays, worked with a team of international scholars to analyze epidemiological studies on gun violence and mental illness, and compared these results to media-fueled public perceptions about the dangerousness of mentally ill individuals.

  • Gray wolves may make a comeback in California

    KPCC – NPR - June 4, 2014
    The gray wolf, hunted to extinction in California nearly 90 years ago, will be listed under the state’s Endangered Species Act. Robert Wayne, professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, says it’s just a matter of time before wolves establish a pack in the Golden State

  • UCLA's Mildred E. Mathias Botanical Garden gets $5 million from Morton La Kretz

    UCLA Newsroom - May 22, 2014
    The funds donated by La Kretz will be used to build a garden pavilion that will house a welcome center and classroom, and to establish an endowment to maintain the new pavilion building. The new facility will be named the La Kretz Garden Pavilion. Construction is scheduled to begin in November 2015 and conclude by the end of 2016.

  • B cells produce antibodies 'when danger calls, but not when it whispers'

    UCLA Newsroom - May 15, 2014
    An international team of life scientists, including senior author, Alexander Hoffmann, a professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics have shown how B-cells respond only to true threats.

  • Calling girls 'fat' may result in weight gain

    UCLA Newsroom - April 28, 2014
    Girls who are told by a parent, sibling, friend, classmate or teacher that they are too fat at age 10 are more likely to be obese at age 19, a new study by UCLA psychologists shows.

  • UCLA Life Scientist, Patricia Greenfield, Elected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    UCLA Newsroom - April 23, 2014
    Patricia Greenfield, Distinguished Professor of Developmental Psychology, has been elected a 2014 Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Climate change a likely culprit in coqui frog's altered calls, say UCLA biologists

    Health Canal - April 14, 2014
    Peter Narins, UCLA distinguished professor of integrative biology and physiology and of ecology and evolutionary biology, and Sebastiaan Meenderink, a UCLA physics researcher have linked changes in Puerto Rican climate over the past three decades to small but significant changes to the coqui frog, the territory's national animal.

  • UCLA Life Scientists' Contribution to Breakthrough therapy allows four paraplegic men to voluntarily move their legs

    UCLA Newsroom - April 07, 2014
    Four young men who have been paralyzed for years achieved groundbreaking progress — moving their legs — as a result of epidural electrical stimulation of the spinal cord– research developed by UCLA life scientists, V. Reggie Edgerton and Yury Gerasimenko.

  • Does a junk food diet make you lazy? UCLA psychology study offers answer

    UCLA Newsroom - April 04, 2014
    A new UCLA psychology study provides evidence that being overweight makes people tired and sedentary — not the other way around.

  • Schools have limited success in reducing bullying

    UCLA Newsroom - April 01, 2014
    UCLA Psychology professor, Jaana Juvonen, and co-author Sandra Graham, a UCLA professor of education have conducted the most thorough analysis to date of studies on school bullying and found that K-12 schools' efforts to curtail bullying are often disappointing.

  • UCLA's Science and Food Series Returns

    LA Weekly - March 25, 2014
    Professor Amy Rowat's Science and Food Series is back with a new lineup, which includes Wylie Dufresne, Ole Mouritsen, Lena Kwak and L.A.'s own Morihiro Onodera.

  • To be Young, Black, and Male

    Huffington Post Blog - March 11, 2014
    Recent research by Phillip Atiba Goff, UCLA assistant professor of social psychology, and Matthew Jackson, a UCLA postdoctoral fellow in social psychology, examines police officers' attitudes toward African-Americans, particularly their perception of young black boys.

  • Nobel laureate Randy Schekman to be keynote speaker at UCLA College commencement

    UCLA Newsroom - March 03, 2014
    Randy Schekman, Nobel laureate, and undergraduate alumnus of UCLA Life Sciences, will be this year's keynote speaker at UCLA College commencement

  • Nanotech methods that use tissue-penetrating light to fight cancer.

    Nanowerk - February 28, 2013
    Fuyu Tamanoi, professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, together with UCLA biochemist, Jeffrey Zink, and other colleagues, have discovered a new nanotechnology method to fight cancer with tissue-penetrating light.

  • Therapy for your marriage — without the therapy

    UCLA Newsroom - February 25, 2014
    Andrew Christensen, professor of Psychology, is the lead author of a new book: "Reconcilable Differences: Rebuild Your Relationship by Rediscovering the Partner You Love — Without Losing Yourself".

  • Biologist, Kirk Lohmueller, awarded 2014 Sloan Research Fellowships

    UCLA Newsroom - February 18, 2014
    Kirk Lohmueller, an assistant professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, is one of two outstanding young professors from UCLA to receive 2014 Sloan Research Fellowships.

  • Heritable bipolar phenotypes pinned down

    Medwire News - February 14, 2014
    A large study led by Carrie Bearden, professor of psychology and psychiatry, has pinpointed brain and behavioural traits that are genetically influenced and associated with bipolar I disorder.

  • What do women want? It depends on the time of the month

    UCLA Newsroom - February 14, 2014
    Martie Haselton, professor of Psychology, and her colleagues have recently published a landmark meta-analysis of sexual preferences at ovulation

  • UCLA scientists awarded $6 million to study new ways to restore hand movement after paralysis

    UCLA Newsroom - February 7, 2014
    Dr. Reggie Edgerton, professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology and UCLA researcher, Dr. Daniel Lu, have been awarded a $6 million, five-year grant to explore new therapies for patients with spinal-cord injuries.

  • New Solutions for Couples Trying to Lose Weight

    UCLA Newsroom - February 3, 2014
    A new book by UCLA psychologists, Thomas Bradbury and Benjamin Karney, shows couples how to team up to lose weight, get healthier.

  • Assessing California's Drought

    NBC Nightly News - January 31, 2014
    Glen MacDonald, director of the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and professor Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, discusses the historical significance and potential impact of the current drought emergency in California.

  • Stem cell agency's grants to UCLA help set stage for revolutionary medicine

    UCLA Newsroom - January 29, 2013
    Lili Yang, assistant professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, is one of four scientists from UCLA who were recently awarded grants by California's stem cell agency.

  • Stem Cells and Prostate Cancer

    Huffington Post - January 24, 2014
    An article about prostate cancer research, highlighting research by Dr. Owen Witte, director of UCLA's Broad Stem Cell Research Center and a professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics.

  • Teen Brains Are Wired to Seek Rewards

    The Examiner - January 13, 2014
    UCLA psychologists Emily Barkley-Levenson and Adriana Galván have found that higher levels of pleasure sensation in teens were related to higher levels of brain activity in the brain’s pleasure center in response to rewards.

  • Adult stem cells found to suppress cancer while dormant

    UCLA Newsroom - December 20, 2013
    UCLA Life Scientists have found a mechanism by which certain adult stem cells suppress their ability to initiate skin cancer during their dormant phase — an understanding that could be exploited for better cancer-prevention strategies.

  • How biophysical research can be applied to your next meal

    Physics Today - December 20, 2013
    In an interview with Life Scientist, Amy Rowat, she discusses her research and how her course "Science & Food" came to be.

  • Early Maternal Bonding Critical for the Developing Brain

    UCLA Newsroom - December 02, 2013
    Researchers from UCLA Department of Psychology and the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior have found that children who experience profound neglect in early life are more prone to show an inappropriate willingness to approach adults, including strangers.

  • Diversity of Facial Colors in Primates (video)

    Slate - November 27, 2013
    A study led by UCLA life scientists suggests that the diversity of facial colors and patterns in Old World apes and monkeys evolved to help the primates identify members of both their own species and other species.

  • How Stress, Poverty, & Ethnicity Affect Young Parents

    UCLA Newsroom - November 27, 2013
    An avalanche of chronic stress — driven by concerns ranging from parenting to discrimination —disproportionately affects poor mothers and fathers, according to the first results from a comprehensive multi-state study.

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  • UCLA research may help scientists understand what causes pregnancy complications

    UCLA Newsroom - November 26, 2013
    Dr. Hanna Mikkola and researchers at UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have identified specific factors that are key to the successful growth of a healthy placenta. The findings could greatly improve the outcome of certain complications that could occur during pregnancy.

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  • Men, Women and Sexual Regret

    Reuters - November 26, 2013
    Men most often regret not having sex with more people while women frequently regret having sex with the wrong partner, according to a recent study carried out by UCLA and University of Texas researchers.

  • Life Scientist, Gordon Fain, named AAAS fellow

    UCLA Newsroom - November 25, 2013
    Gordon Fain, distinguished Professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology is one of three UCLA faculty that were selected as fellows this year by the American Association for the Advancement of Science,AAAS.

  • The New Science of Disaster Prediction

    New Yorker - November 19, 2013
    Article citing research by UCLA Life Scientists, that predicts where the next global flu pandemic will originate.

  • New Fish Species Discovered in Coral Triangle

    Associated Press - November 13, 2013
    Scientists from Conservation International and the Indonesian Biodiversity Research Centre (affiliated with UCLA Life Sciences),have recently discovered a new species of flasher wrasse in the coral reefs of Indonesia.

  • UCLA biologists uncover rules that govern leaf design

    UCLA Newsroom - October 30, 2013
    UCLA Life Scientists have discovered fundamental rules of leaf design that underlie plants' ability to produce leaves that vary enormously in size.

  • A new national database to track racial profiling by law-enforcement agencies

    MSNBC's "The Cycle" - October 23, 2013
    Philip Atiba Goff, UCLA assistant professor of social psychology, was interviewed Wednesday on MSNBC's "The Cycle" about receiving a National Science Foundation grant to establish a new national database that tracks racial profiling by law-enforcement agencies.

  • UCLA psychologists report new insights on human brain, consciousness

    UCLA Newsroom - October 17, 2013
    Brain-imaging studies carried out by UCLA psychologists, show what happens to the human brain when it slips into unconsciousness.

  • Darwinian Salamander Dilemma

    NPR - September 12, 2013
    H. Bradley Shaffer, professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, discusses the ecological dangers resulting from the interbreeding of endangered California salamanders and imported Texas salamanders, which has created a new type of hybrid "super-salamander."

  • Are Grey Wolves Endangered?

    Nature - September 11, 2013
    Research led by Robert Wayne, professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, weighs in on the controversy accompanying the federal government's proposal to remove grey wolves from the endangered species list.

  • Four Prominent UCLA Stem Cell Researchers Receive CIRM Early Translational Grants

    UCLA Newsroom - August 30, 2013
    Jerome Zack and Donald Kohn, professors of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics are among four UCLA scientists who received Early Translational grants totaling $13M from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

  • Using UCLA framework, Alabama, Georgia lead way in addressing barriers to learning

    UCLA Newsroom - August 29, 2013
    School districts are making changes - using a framework developed by UCLA psychologists, Howard Adelman and Linda Taylor - that are improving student performance and graduation rates.

  • Preserving Cameroon's treasures

    LA Times Op Ed - August 27, 2013
    Tom Smith, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Director of UCLA's Center for Tropical Research, lays out the imminent threats facing Cameroon's great biodiversity.

  • Blogging Helps Cancer Patients

    Examiner - August 12, 2013
    New research led by Dr. Annette Stanton, professor of Psychology and member of UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, shows that women who chronicled their experiences with breast cancer online, tended to experience a reduction in depressive symptoms, an increase in positive mood and enhanced appreciation for life.

  • UCLA Stem Cell Researcher Wins Prestigious McCulloch and Till Award

    Newswise - August 26, 2013
    Dr. Hanna Mikkola, associate professor of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology received the 2013 McCulloch and Till Award from the Society for Hematology and Stem Cells.

  • How Human Psychology 'Evolved' Due To Urbanization And Education

    Science 2.0 - August 7, 2013
    UCLA psychologist Patricia Greenfield analyzed words used in more than 1.5 million American and British books published between 1800 and 2000, showing how our cultural values have changed.

  • UCLA Life scientist wins award in vision sciences

    UCLA Today - July 23, 2013
    Gordon L. Fain, distinguished professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology, is the recipient of Brandeis University’s fourth annual Jay Pepose ’75 Award in Vision Sciences.

  • What we can learn from studying Marmots

    National Public Radio - July 19, 2013
    Daniel Blumstein, professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, talks about his ongoing research on yellow-bellied marmots, which is giving us insight into mammalian personality traits, climate change, and the evolution of fear.

  • Recession May Have Boosted Teens' Social Consciousness

    U.S. News & World Report - July 11, 2013
    UCLA Psychology professor Patricia Greenfield, and her colleagues have found that during the recent recession, concern for other people and the environment rose among American teens.

  • Science Builds a Better Pie

    New York Times - July 2, 2013
    Amy Rowat, assistant professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology, shares her scientific insights on how to create a perfect crust.

  • Anatomical Diversity and Evolution

    Christian Science Monitor - June 6, 2013
    Michael Alfaro, associate professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and his colleagues have found that the speed at which new species emerge is strongly correlated with the speed at which changes in body size evolve.

  • Gestures of Human and Ape Infants are more similar than you think

    Smithsonian Magazine Blog - June 6, 2013
    Researchers from our Department of Psychology, and their collaborators, have found that there is a similarity in the form and function of the gestures used by chimpanzees, bonobos and human infants.

  • No Link Seen Between Child Stimulant Use and Later Drug Abuse

    New York Times - May 28, 2013
    UCLA researchers have found that children who take medications for ADHD are at no greater risk of using alcohol, marijuana, nicotine or cocaine later in life.

  • UCLA life scientists present new insights on climate change and species interactions

    UCLA Newsroom - May 21, 2013
    Van Savage, UCLA assistant professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and of Biomathematics, and former UCLA postdoctoral researchers Anthony Dell and Samraat Pawar have shed new light on how climate change will affect interactions between species. This knowledge, they say, is critical to making accurate predictions and informing policymakers of how species are likely to be impacted by rising temperatures.

  • Jonathan Gold: 10 things you should know about pie

    LA Times Daily Dish - May 20, 2013
    Jonathan Gold describes being a pie judge for an apple pie contest that was part of Amy Rowat’s undergraduate science-and-food class at UCLA, a bake-off that was equal parts cooking contest and science fair.

  • Bird Songs and Satellites

    United Academics - May 16, 2013
    A team led by Thomas Smith, director of the UCLA Center for Tropical Research and a professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, found that data from satellites, when combined with traditional field studies, could help predict the variations in singing by a common songbird. The finding could lead to a better understanding of the evolution and variation of animal species.

  • Brain rewires itself after damage or injury, life scientists discover

    UCLA Newsroom - May 15, 2013
    When the brain's primary "learning center" is damaged, complex new neural circuits arise to compensate for the lost function, say life scientists from UCLA and Australia who have pinpointed the regions of the brain involved in creating those alternate pathways — often far from the damaged site.

  • Pig Flu on the Rise

    International Business Times - May 8, 2013
    James Lloyd-Smith, UCLA assistant professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and his colleagues have found that the incidence of flu is rising among pigs in China.

  • A Single Gene May Extend Lifespan by 25 Percent

    US News and World Report - May 6, 2013
    David Walker, associate professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology, and Anil Rana, a UCLA postdoctoral scholar, have identified a gene that can extend the healthy life span of fruit flies by more than 25 percent.

  • Boosting 'cellular garbage disposal' can delay the aging process

    UCLA Newsroom - May 06, 2013
    David Walker, associate professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology, and his colleagues have identified a gene previously implicated in Parkinson's disease that can delay the onset of aging and extend the healthy life span of fruit flies. The research, they say, could have important implications for aging and disease in humans.

  • When 'Cheating' Teaches Students More

    Popular Science - April 24, 2013
    An article about how Peter Nonacs, professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, lets students in his behavioral ecology class "cheat" on their midterm to teach them more about game theory.

  • UCLA Psychology Professor, Robert Bjork, among newest fellows elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    UCLA Newsroom - April 24, 2013
    UCLA Psychology Professor, Robert Bjork, is among the newest class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious honorary societies and independent policy research centers.

  • Top Chef at UCLA ’Science and Food’ Event

    The Eater - April 18, 2013
    The Eater blog on Thursday highlighted this year's first UCLA "Science and Food" event, which featured Brazilian chef Alex Atala. Organized by Amy Rowat, UCLA assistant professor of integrative biology and physiology, the events are presented in conjunction with Rowat's academic course "Science and Food: The Physical and Molecular Origins of What We Eat."

  • Blocking a key protein boosts immune system's ability to clear chronic infection

    UCLA Newsroom - April 11, 2013
    UCLA scientists have shown that temporarily blocking a protein critical to immune response actually helps the body clear itself of chronic infection. Published in the April 12 edition of the journal Science, the finding suggests new approaches to treating persistent viral infections like HIV and hepatitis C.

  • Adriana Galván selected a William T. Grant Scholar

    UCLA Today - April 10, 2013
    Adriana Galván, assistant professor of Psychology, has been selected a William T. Grant Scholar by the William T. Grant Foundation. The award is given to exceptional researchers early in their careers. Galván’s laboratory studies brain development in children, adolescents and adults using behavioral and neuroimaging techniques.

  • Scientists decode genome of painted turtle, revealing clues to extraordinary adaptations

    UCLA Newsroom - April 10, 2013
    Humans could learn a thing or two from turtles, and scientists who have just sequenced the first turtle genome uncovered clues about how people can benefit from the shelled creatures' remarkable longevity and ability to survive for months without breathing.

  • Army veteran, a UCLA student, teaches class on combat and military life

    UCLA Newsroom - April 5, 2013
    his spring, Andrew Nicholls, a UCLA senior and eight-year army veteran, shared his firsthand perspectives about the military and combat by teaching a new psychology course through the Psychology department called "Fast Cars and Battle Scars: Understanding the Modern Combat Veteran and PTSD".

  • Adoptees Do Equally Well in Gay, Straight Families

    Wall Street Journal - April 3, 2013
    Social-science research on same-sex families highlighted a study by Jill Waterman, UCLA adjunct professor of psychology; Letitia Anne Peplau, UCLA distinguished research professor of psychology; and Justin Lavner, a UCLA doctoral candidate in psychology, showing that high-risk children adopted from foster care do equally well when they are placed with gay, lesbian or heterosexual parents.

  • Blue flies, deterioration of the intestinal barrier, and age-related death

    The Scientist - April 1, 2013
    Aging is marked by the accumulation of wear and tear on the body’s organs and tissues, but the specific kinds of damage that usher in death are still unknown. David Walker and his colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles, suspected that the intestines may play a key role. In previous studies, when energy metabolism in the intestines was boosted, the flies’ lifespan increased.

  • Profile: Amy Rowat

    Canada’s Guelph Mercury - March 31, 2013
    A profile on Amy Rowat, UCLA assistant professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology, highlighting her annual "Science and Food" public events, which feature top chefs and are presented in conjunction with her UCLA academic course, "Science and Food: The Physical and Molecular Origins of What We Eat."

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  • Predicting hotspots for future flu outbreaks

    UCLA Newsroom - March 13, 2013
    Thomas Smith, director of the UCLA Center for Tropical Research and professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Trevon Fuller, a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Tropical Research have developed a technique that allows us to predict sites where human and bird viruses could mix and generate a future pandemic.

  • While you're on your computer, why not strengthen your marriage?

    UCLA Newsroom - March 7, 2013
    Andrew Christensen, professor of Psychology who has worked with hundreds of couples over more than 30 years, worked with his colleague Brian Doss, a UCLA alumnus, to designed a website, www.OurRelationship.com, that allows you and your partner to strengthen your marriage— for free and from the comfort of your own home.

  • Strong family support decreases likelihood of postpartum depression

    UCLA Newsroom - March 4, 2013
    UCLA postdoctoral scholar in Psychology, Jennifer Hahn-Holbrook,led new research showing that women with strong social support from their families during pregnancy appear to be protected from sharp increases in a particular stress hormone, making them less likely to experience post-partum depression.

  • UCLA study could provide insight into recent TB outbreak in L.A.'s skid row

    UCLA Newsroom - February 28, 2013
    UCLA researchers, including senior author Dr. Robert L. Modlin, Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics have found that certain bacteria — including the type that causes tuberculosis — can act like viruses and hide out, unhindered, inside our cells.

  • 'Defective' virus surprisingly plays major role in spread of disease

    UCLA Newsroom - February 28, 2013
    UCLA postdoctoral scholar Ruian Ke, and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology professor James Lloyd-Smith, have found that defective viruses help normal, functional viruses by increasing the transmission of the functional virus.

  • Newly identified natural protein blocks HIV, other deadly viruses

    UCLA Newsroom - February 11, 2013
    Graduate student Su-Yang Liu and Genhong Cheng, a professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics worked alongside collaborators to identify a protein with broad virus-fighting properties that potentially could be used against deadly human pathogenic viruses such as HIV, Ebola, and Rift Valley Fever.

  • UCLA life scientists identify drug that could aid treatment of anxiety disorders

    UCLA Newsroom - February 20, 2013
    The drug scopolamine has been used to treat a variety of conditions, including nausea and motion sickness. A new study by UCLA life scientists suggests that it may also be useful in treating anxiety disorders.

  • UCLA Life Scientists named 2013 Sloan Fellow

    UCLA Newsroom - February 20, 2013
    Yi Xing, an associate professor in the department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics and a member of UCLA's Institute for Molecular Medicine is among a select group of young scientists to receive a 2013 Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  • Brain scientists examine Arial Sharon's brain post-brain hemorrhage

    UCLA Newsroom - January 28, 2013
    A team of American and Israeli brain scientists, including Martin Monti, an assistant professor of psychology and neurosurgery at UCLA, tested former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to assess his brain responses, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Surprisingly, Sharon showed significant brain activity.

  • 'Cool' kids in middle school bully more

    UCLA Newsroom - January 24, 2013
    Bullying, whether it's physical aggression or spreading rumors, boosts the social status and popularity of middle school students, according to a new UCLA psychology study that has implications for programs aimed at combatting school bullying.

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  • UCLA’s 'Secret' Garden

    Los Angeles Daily News - January 11, 2013
    Joshua Siskin's story highlighting UCLA’s seven-acre Mildred E. Mathias Botanical Garden, located on the Westwood campus, with its collection of more than 5,000 tropical, sub-tropical and Mediterranean plant species.

  • Why older adults are more susceptible to swindlers

    Nature.com - December 3, 2012
    Shelley E. Taylor, UCLA distinguished professor of Psychology, and her colleagues, including lead author Elizabeth Castle, have found that "older adults seem to be particularly vulnerable to interpersonal solicitations, and their reduced sensitivity to cues related to trust may partially underlie this vulnerability."

  • The Latest UCLA Life Science Professors to be named AAAS Fellows

    UCLA Newsroom - November 29, 2012
    UCLA Life Scientists, Genhong Cheng and Jeffery F. Miller, are the latest scholars to be named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general scientific society and the publisher of the journal Science.

  • UCLA Supports Latino students in Life Sciences

    Univision - November 14, 2012
    Victoria Sork, Dean of the UCLA Division of Life Sciences; Alvaro Sagasti, associate professor of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology; and Life Sciences student Angelica Riestra were interviewed by Univision about how UCLA is increasing opportunities and scholarships for excellent underrepresented minority students in the sciences.

  • UCLA Life Scientist Wins MacArthur 'Genius' Grant

    Wall Street Journal - October 1, 2012
    Elissa Hallem, assistant professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics and a member of UCLA's Molecular Biology Institute, has been selected as a 2012 MacArthur Fellow.

  • UCLA life scientist wins NIH ENCODE grant

    UCLA Today - September 26, 2012
    Xinshu (Grace) Xiao, assistant professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology, is among 15 outstanding scientists nationwide to be awarded a grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) to expand the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE), a comprehensive catalog of functional elements that control the expression of genetic information in a cell. She and her research group will identify genetic differences that alter RNA processing. Her research project aims to understand functions of genetic variants, such as mutations, in our genomes.

  • Harmless viruses may provide cure for acne

    UCLA Newsroom - September 25, 2012
    In a new study, Laura Marinelli, a UCLA postdoctoral researcher and Dr. Robert Modlin, professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics and their collaborators found that a specific group of benign viruses that live alongside acne-causing bacteria have the power to stop acne before it starts.

  • Should I marry him?

    Huffington Post UK - September 17, 2012
    UCLA Psychology doctoral candidate Justin Lavner, along with Thomas Bradbury and Benjamin Karney, professors of psychology and co-directors of the Relationship Institute at UCLA, have shown that pre-wedding uncertainty, especially among women, predicts higher divorce rates and less marital satisfaction years later.

  • Immune systems of 'bubble babies' restored by gene therapy

    UCLA Newsroom - September 11, 2012
    Dr. Donald Kohn, professor of Microbiology, Immunology, & Molecular Genetics, and member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research, and his colleagues have demonstrated that a combination of chemotherapy and gene therapy may help doctors treat children with "bubble boy" disease, in which the body cannot successfully fight off germs.

  • Expressing your emotions can reduce fear

    UCLA Newsroom - September 4, 2012
    Katharina Kircanski, a former UCLA graduate student and Michelle Craske, UCLA professor of Psychology, showed that by labeling emotions at stressful times people felt less afraid and less anxious.

  • Why are there so many species of beetles and so few crocodiles?

    UCLA Newsroom - August 28, 2012
    Michael Alfaro, UCLA associate professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, is senior author of a new study that suggests that 'adaptive zones' limits species number.

  • Embryonic blood vessels that produce blood stem cells can also make heart muscle cells

    UCLA Newsroom - July 31, 2012
    Dr. Hanna Mikkola, Associate Professor of Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology and her team have found that precursor cells in the endothelium that normally generate blood stem cells can become beating cardiomyocytes, or heart muscle cells.

  • Bob Goldberg’s course 'Genetic Engineering & Society' is now online, across the world

    UCLA Newsroom - July 31, 2012
    Starting August 6, Bob Goldberg, a distinguished professor of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, will teach a remarkable six-week online course titled "Genetic Engineering and Society" – a general education course in the UCLA Division of Life Sciences that is designed for non-science majors.

  • UCLA research makes possible rapid assessment of plant drought tolerance

    UCLA Newsroom - July 25, 2012
    UCLA professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Lawren Sack, working with colleagues in China, have discovered a new method to quickly assess plants’ drought tolerance. The method works for many diverse species growing around the world. The research, may revolutionize the ability to survey plant species for their ability to withstand drought.

  • Are males more promiscuous and females choosier in selecting mates?

    Asian News International - June 27, 2012
    Recent research published by Patricia Gowaty, UCLA distinguished professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, debunks a 1948 study of fruit flies that established the notion that males are more promiscuous and females more picky.

  • Dissonant Music Brings out the Animal in Us

    Science Daily - June 13, 2012
    Research by Daniel Blumstein, professor and chair of the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Greg Bryant, UCLA assistant professor of communication studies, has shown that distorted and jarring music tends to excite listeners because it mimics the distress calls of animals.

  • Multiple Causes of Woolly Mammoth Extinction

    UPI - June 12, 2012
    A study by Glen MacDonald, director of UCLA's Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and a professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) along with Robert Wayne and Blaire Van Valkenburgh, also EEB professors, found that woolly mammoths succumbed to a lethal combination of climate warming, encroaching humans and habitat change between 4,000 and 10,000 years ago.

  • Paul Terasaki to Receive the UCLA’s Highest Honor, the UCLA Medal

    UCLA Newsroom - May 23, 2012
    Paul Ichiro Terasaki, a pioneer in organ transplant medicine, will be awarded the UCLA Medal, the university's highest honor, at the UCLA College of Letters and Science commencement ceremony on June 15.

  • Paul Terasaki receives Edward A. Dickson Alumnus of the Year award for outstanding service and achievements

    UCLA Newsroom - May 4, 2012
    On May 4, 2012, Paul Terasaki was presented with the Edward A. Dickson Alumnus of the Year award for his vital contributions to the field of organ transplantation, and for his immensely generous contributions to UCLA, in particular to the Division of Life Sciences.

  • Life Science Professors James A. Lake and Larry Simpson, Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    UCLA Newsroom - April 17, 2012
    James A. Lake, Distinguished professor of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology and Human Genetics, and Larry Simpson, Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics are among 220 distinguished scholars, scientists, authors, artists, and business and philanthropic leaders elected today to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in recognition of their outstanding accomplishments.

  • UCLA biochemist Sabeeha Merchant elected to National Academy of Sciences

    UCLA Newsroom - May 2, 2012
    UCLA Biochemistry professor Sabeeha Merchant, a valued contributor to UCLA Life Sciences’ plant research program was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of her "distinguished and continuing achievements in original research."

  • Life scientist, Elissa Hallem, is honored as a Searle Scholar

    UCLA Newsroom - April 13, 2012
    Elissa Hallem, assistant professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, was named a 2012 Searle Scholar, for her innovative and interdisciplinary research on host-parasite interactions.

  • UCLA Life Sciences undergraduate receives 2012 Charles E. Young Humanitarian Award

    UCLA Newsroom - May 3, 2012
    Kendra Knudson, a UCLA undergraduate majoring in psychobiology, was awarded the 2012 Charles E. Young Humanitarian Award for developing the Creative Minds Project at Step Up on Second, a nonprofit organization in Santa Monica that serves people with mental illness. The project utilizes creative art therapies to foster change and progress toward recovery, stability and reintegration into society.

  • UCLA life scientists view biodiversity through a whole new dimension

    UCLA Newsroom - May 30, 2012
    Van Savage, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Assistant Professor, Samraat Pawar, a post-doctoral scholar in Savage’s group, and their collaborators have demonstrated for the first time that the relationship between animals' body size and their feeding rate — the overall amount of food they consume per unit of time — is largely determined by the properties of the space in which they search for their food.

  • How Fructose Affects Learning, Memory

    Forbes - May 16, 2012
    Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, a professor of neurosurgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine, and a professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology, was co-author of a recent study showing that a steady high-fructose diet can slow the brain and hamper memory and learning in rats — and how omega-3 fatty acids can minimize the damage.

  • Hacking Code of Leaf Vein Architecture Solves Mysteries, Allows Predictions of Past Climate

    UCLA Newsroom - May 22, 2012
    Lawren Sack, professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, along with graduate student Christine Scoffoni, three UCLA undergraduate researchers, and colleagues have discovered new laws that determine the construction of leaf vein systems as leaves grow and evolve. The research, has a range of fundamental implications for global ecology and allows researchers to estimate original leaf sizes from just a fragment of a leaf. W improve scientists' prediction and interpretation of climate in the deep past from leaf fossils.

  • People's Geographic Origins Traceable With New Genetic Method

    Medical News Today - May 29 2012
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology professor John Novembre teamed with researchers from UCLA’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and Tel Aviv University to develop a new genetic method that can pinpoint an individual's geographic origin, just by sampling your genome.

  • 'Rare' genetic variants are surprisingly common, life scientists report

    UCLA Newsroom - May 18, 2012
    John Novembre, assistant professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology recently led a large study of human genetic variation, published today in the online version of the journal Science. The study shows that rare genetic variants are not so rare after all and offers insights into human diseases.

  • Rene Redzepi and Lars Williams at UCLA: Seaweed Ice Cream + Cricket Sauce

    LA Weekly - May 8, 2012
    This LA Weekly food blog describes the fun had at the last “Science and Food” public lecture, with Integrative Biology and Physiology professor Amy Rowat, and celebrity guest lecturers: Rene Redzepi and Lars Williams.

  • Effective Ad? Ask Your Brain

    Science - April 27, 2012
    Matthew Lieberman, UCLA professor of Psychology and of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral sciences, led a study in which researchers imaged the brains of smokers while they were asked to rate the effectiveness of several anti-smoking ads, with surprising results.

  • Which Plants Will Survive Droughts, Climate Change?

    UCLA Newsroom - April 5, 2012
    Graduate students Megan Bartlett and Christine Scoffoni, along with Lawren Sack, professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, recently published new findings that could lead to predictions of which plant species will escape extinction from climate change.

  • UCLA stem cell research may benefit diabetics

    Examiner - March 11, 2012
    Ji Won Shim, a UCLA postdoctoral fellow working with Utpal Banerjee, UCLA Professor and Chairman of the Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology department, recently published a study in Nature Cell Biology showing that insulin and nutrition keep blood stem cells from differentiating into mature blood cells. This finding could benefit diabetics, through its implications for studying inflammatory response and blood development in response to dietary changes in humans.

  • A bird's song may teach us about human speech disorders

    UCLA Newsroom - March 6, 2012
    Stephanie White, a UCLA associate professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology is senior author of a new study that found 2,000 genes expressed in a region of the male zebra finch's brain, that are significantly linked to singing. At least some of these genes are shared by humans, and are likely important for human speech.

  • UCLA scientists identify a cell signaling pathway that regulates blood stem cells in placenta

    UCLA Newsroom - March 1, 2012
    Dr. Hanna Mikkola, UCLA associate professor of Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology, recently led a study that found a specific cell signaling pathway in the placenta that plays a key role in stopping blood stem cells from differentiating into mature blood cells in the placenta. This is critical to ensure proper blood supply for an individual's lifetime.

  • UCLA Life Sciences Assistant Professor awarded prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship

    UCLA Newsroom - February 16, 2012
    John Novembre, an assistant professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology is among 126 scientists and scholars to receive a 2012 Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  • UCLA Life Science postdoctoral researcher awarded Damon Runyon Fellowship

    UCLA Today - January 11, 2012
    Postdoctoral researcher Yanling Wang has been named a Damon Runyon Fellow by the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, a non-profit organization focused on supporting exceptional early career researchers and innovative cancer research.

  • Evolution is written all over your face

    UCLA Newsroom - January 9, 2012
    Michael Alfaro, associate professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and his colleagues shed light on why faces of primates look so dramatically different from one another.

  • Stem Cell Study: Balancing blood supply

    The Examiner - December 22, 2011
    Utpal Banerjee, the Irving and Jean Stone Professor and chairman of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology co-authored a study showing that two-way signaling from two different sets of cells is necessary for bloody-supply balance, both to ensure that enough blood cells are produced to respond to injury and infection and that blood progenitor cells remain available for future needs.

  • Understanding our cross-wired senses

    UCLA Newsroom - December 8, 2011
    Ladan Shams, associate professor of Cognitive Psychology recently led research that found that our senses of sight and hearing work closely together, perhaps more so than we might have thought.

  • Life Science Professor, Robert Modlin named AAAS fellow

    UCLA Newsroom - December 7, 2011
    Robert Modlin, professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, has been named a fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science for "distinguished contributions toward understanding human antimicrobial pathways, including Th1/Th2 cytokines, TLR 2 recognition of microbial lipoproteins, and the role of vitamin D in immunity."

  • UCLA stem cell researchers reprogram human skin cells to become nerve cells

    Examiner.com - December 7, 2011
    William Lowry, an assistant professor of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, and associate researcher Saran Karumbayaram, have taken human skin cells, reprogrammed them into cells with the same unlimited property as embryonic stem cells, and then differentiated them into neurons while completely avoiding the use of animal-based reagents and feeder conditions throughout the process.

  • Powerful mathematical model greatly improves predictions for species facing climate change

    UCLA Newsroom - December 02, 2011
    Robert Wayne, professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, is co-author of a recent study that produced the most comprehensive mathematical model ever devised to track the health of populations exposed to environmental change. The team's groundbreaking integral projection model allows researchers to link many different data sources simultaneously.

  • A new study finds key differences between established and new human embryonic stem cell lines.

    Scientist - December 2, 2011
    Amander Clark, assistant professor of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, and colleagues recently found that established human embryonic stem cell lines, including those approved for federal research funding, differ from newly derived human embryonic stem cell lines. This finding highlights the importance of continuing to derive new stem cell lines so that researchers can better understand the ability of these cells to make every cell in the human body.

  • UCLA Distinguished Prof. Robert Modlin elected as a fellow by AAAS

    AAAS - December 07, 2011
    Robert Modlin, Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, has been selected as a fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general scientific society and the publisher of the journal Science.

  • Powerful mathematical model greatly improves predictions for species facing climate change

    UCLA Newsroom - December 02, 2011
    Robert Wayne, professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, recently led research that produced the most comprehensive mathematical model ever devised to track the health of populations exposed to environmental change. The team's groundbreaking integral projection model allows researchers to link many different data sources simultaneously. Scientists can now change just a single variable, like temperature, and see how that affects many factors for a population.

  • Established human embryonic cell lines vary from newly derived stem cell lines

    UCLA Newsroom - December 02, 2011
    Amander Clark, UCLA assistant professor of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, and colleagues recently found that established human embryonic stem cell lines, including those approved for federal research funding, differ from newly derived human embryonic stem cell lines. This finding highlights the importance of continuing to derive new stem cell lines so that researchers can better understand the ability of these cells to make every cell in the human body.

  • Stem cells engineered to kill cancer

    United Press International - Nov 29, 2011
    Jerome Zack, professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, and his colleagues, have recently engineered blood stem cells to create immune cells that seek out and attack a type of human melanoma.

  • UCLA Biologists Slow the Aging Process in Fruit Flies

    UCLA Newsroom - November 8, 2011
    David Walker, assistant professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology, recently led a study showing that when the expression of a single gene, PGC-1, was boosted within the digestive tracts of fruit flies, the flies lived as much as fifty percent longer. PGC-1 activates the cells' mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial activity in mammals and flies.

  • UCLA Terasaki Life Sciences Building Wins Architecture Award

    R&D Magazine - October 17, 2011
    The 2011 Brick in Architecture Awards, sponsored by the Brick Industry Assn., have recognized the Terasaki Life Sciences Building at the University of California-Los Angeles as Best in Class in the Educational category. The architect was Bohlin Cywinski Jackson; Stenfors Associates Architects was the associate.

  • Scientists Find Vitamin D Crucial in Human Immune Response to TB

    US News & World Report - October 10, 2011
    An international team of scientists, including Dr. Robert Modlin, UCLA professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, has found that vitamin D also plays an essential role in the body’s immune response against infections such as tuberculosis.

  • UCLA Life Scientists Win 'Breakthrough' Award

    Popular Mechanics - October 3, 2011
    V. Reggie Edgerton, UCLA distinguished professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology and Yury Gerasimenko, a UCLA researcher in Integrative Biology and Physiology and director of the laboratory of movement physiology at Russia's St. Petersburg's Pavlov Institute are among the four recipients of the 2011 Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Award for a new procedure that uses direct electrical stimulation to give spinal injury patients back some voluntary movement.

  • UCLA scientists find H1N1 flu virus prevalent in animals in Africa

    UCLA Newsroom - September 22, 2011
    Thomas B. Smith, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and colleagues, recently discovered the first evidence of the H1N1 virus in animals in Africa. In one village in northern Cameroon, a staggering 89 percent of the pigs studied had been exposed to the H1N1 virus, commonly known as the swine flu.

  • UCLA Life Sciences’ cancer researcher wins NIH award for leading-edge science

    UCLA Today - September 21, 2011
    Utpal Banerjee, the Irving and Jean Stone Professor and chairman of the Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology Department received the National Institutes of Heath’s Pioneer Award, which recognizes leading-edge, innovative research.

  • UCLA psychologists discover a gene's link to optimism, self-esteem

    UCLA Newsroom - September 13, 2011
    Shelley E. Taylor, distinguished professor in the department of Psychology, is senior author of new research that has identified for the first time, a particular gene's link to optimism, self-esteem, and "mastery," the belief that one has control over one's own life— three critical psychological resources for coping well with stress and depression.

  • Cells derived from pluripotent stem cells may pose challenges for clinical use

    ScienceDaily - August 18, 2011
    UCLA research studying the nature of human pluripotent stem cells featured William Lowry, assistant professor of molecular, cell and development biology and a researcher with the Broad Stem Cell Research Center, led the study. The findings could have implications both clinically, in terms of transplantation, and for disease modeling.

  • How to Close the Race Gap in H.I.V.?

    New York Times Op-Ed - August 10, 2011
    Vickie Mays, UCLA professor of psychology, professor of health services in the School of Public Health, and director of the UCLA Center for Research, Education, Training and Strategic Communication on Minority Health Disparities, addressed how sex education and intervention programs can potentially lower the incidence of HIV among young gay African-American men.

  • Study of abalone yields new insights into sexual reproduction

    UCLA Newsroom - Aug. 3, 2011
    Richard Zimmer, a UCLA distinguished professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, and his team, recently published new research on sperm and egg interactions in red abalone, an ocean-dwelling snail. Implications of this research could improve the treatment of human infertility.

  • School Dangers and Cyber-bullying

    LA Times - August 1, 2011
    A column in today's Los Angeles Times about the dangers kids face at school cites a study led by UCLA psychology professor Jaana Juvonen that found that nearly three in four teenagers had been bullied online during a 12-month period.

  • Recent NIH grant funds UCLA HIV research

    Daily Bruin - August 1, 2011
    Jerome Zack, director of the UCLA Center for Aids Research and UCLA professor in the department microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics, and his research team were recently awarded an NIH grant to develop medication that, in a limited number of treatments, could completely rid infected individuals of HIV.

  • Waging war against the superbug

    UCLA Today - July 25, 2011
    UCLA Today profiles Jeffrey H. Miller, Professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, cutting-edge scientist and educator, who has been working on what has become a major public health crisis in the United States– the steep rise in drug-resistant infections.

  • Life scientists use novel technique to produce genetic map for African Americans

    UCLA Newsroom - July 22, 2011
    John Novembre, UCLA assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and a member of UCLA's Interdepartmental Program in Bioinformatics, is senior author of a recent paper that published one of the first genetic maps pinpointing where DNA is likely to be reshuffled in the genomes of African Americans — a tool that could help scientists find genes that cause disease.

  • Mapping of 'sixth nucleotide' in embryonic stem cells indicates it may activate genes

    Examiner.com - July 21, 2011
    Research led by Steven E. Jacobsen, a professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology and a researcher at UCLA's Broad Stem Cell Research Center has led to the first genome-wide mapping of the so-called "sixth nucleotide" in human embryonic stem cells and discovered that the molecule is found predominantly in genes that are turned on, or active.

  • Brain's 'clock' less accurate with aging

    UPI - July 19, 2011
    Research by Gene Block, UCLA chancellor and professor of psychiatry, biobehavioral sciences and physiology, and Christopher Colwell, UCLA professor-in-residence of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences, shows that mice, that the pattern of activity in the brain region that regulates circadian rhythms begins to decay when the animals hit middle age. This research could provide clues as to why sleep patterns change as people grow older.

  • The labeling of genetically modified foods

    LA Times - July 10, 2011
    Goldberg, UCLA distinguished professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology, was BRIEFLY quoted Sunday in a Los Angeles Times article about the labeling of genetically modified foods.

  • Popular TV shows teach children fame is most important value

    Time - July 11, 2011
    Patricia M. Greenfield, a UCLA distinguished professor of psychology and collaborators found that “Fame” is the No. 1 value emphasized by television shows popular with 9- to 11-year-olds, a dramatic change over the past 10 years.

  • Energy-storage capacity of ancient microorganism could lead to power source for synthetic cells

    UCLA Newsroom - July 5, 2011
    Using state-of-the-art imaging equipment at the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at UCLA, Robert Gunsalus, professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics, has shown for the first time that a microbe known as Methanosprillum hungatei, contains incredibly efficient energy-storage structures.

  • Leaf sizes tied to water availability

    USA Today - July 12, 2011
    Using three-dimensional computer models, Lawren Sack, UCLA professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and collaborators, including Ph.D. candidate and lead author, Christine Scoffoni, simulated the impacts of embolisms on water transport for leaves of different sizes and vein architectures. They found that the distinct vein systems of smaller leaves are structurally and physiologically better adapted for plants to live in dry soil, contributing to survival during periods of drought.

  • Life scientists use novel technique to produce genetic map for African Americans

    UCLA Newsroom - July 22, 2011
    John Novembre, UCLA assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and a member of UCLA's Interdepartmental Program in Bioinformatics, is senior author of a recent paper that published one of the first genetic maps pinpointing where DNA is likely to be reshuffled in the genomes of African Americans — a tool that could help scientists find genes that cause disease.

  • Mapping of 'sixth nucleotide' in embryonic stem cells indicates it may activate genes

    UCLA Newsroom - July 21, 2011
    Research by Steve Jacobsen, professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, that generated the first genome-wide mapping of a DNA modification called 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in embryonic stem cells.

  • Smaller leaves: adapting to drier conditions

    UCLA Newsroom - July 5, 2011
    Lawren Sack, UCLA professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and collaborators, including Ph.D. candidate and lead author Christine Scoffoni, used three-dimensional computer models to simulate water transport within the veins of different sized leaves. They found that the distinct vein systems of smaller leaves are structurally and physiologically better adapted for plants to live in dry soil, contributing to survival during periods of drought.

  • Prof. James Lake awarded prestigious Darwin Wallace Medal

    UCLA Today - June 8, 2011
    James A. Lake, UCLA Distinguished Professor of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology and Human Genetics, was awarded the Darwin Wallace Medal for major research advances in evolutionary biology. He received the award on May 24 at the anniversary meeting of the Linnean Society of London.

  • In Pain? Find a Photo of a Loved One

    Wired - June 29, 2011
    Naomi Eisenberger, UCLA assistant professor of psychology, and her team recently published a brain-imaging study showing that young women who were administered a moderate pain stimulus experienced a reduction in pain when they viewed a photograph of their boyfriend.

  • Life Science Professors, Benhur Lee, and Douglas Black, awarded state stem cell grants

    UCLA Stem Cell News - June 14, 2011
    Life Sciences professors, were two of three UCLA researchers awarded state stem cell grants totaling $3.9 million. These grants will fund investigations into the basic mechanisms underlying stem cell biology, cellular differentiation and cellular plasticity, the ability of adult stem cells to become cells other than their cell of origin.

  • Life sciences professor awarded Rita Allen Foundation grant

    UCLA Today - June 20, 2011
    Elissa Hallem, assistant professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics and a member of UCLA's Molecular Biology Institute, has been honored as a 2011 Rita Allen Foundation Scholar. The award is granted to seven researchers in biomedical science who will receive a total of $3.5 million in grants as 2011 Rita Allen Foundation Scholars.

  • The Long Tale of the Opossum

    New York Times - June 13, 2011
    A column in Monday's New York Times about opossums cited research by Ines Horovitz, UCLA assistant adjunct professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, suggesting that the earliest marsupials most likely resembled opossums. Horovitz was quoted.

  • Sugar-binding protein may play a role in HIV infection

    June 13, 2011 - UCLA Newsroom
    Benhur Lee UCLA professor of MIMG co-authored a paper whose main findings could lead researchers to a potential new target for anti-HIV therapeutics.

  • UCLA teams with Roche to advance stem cell research

    June 9, 2011 - LA Examiner
    UCLA announced that they have partnered with Roche to give UCLA stem cell and cancer scientists early access to leading-edge technologies in an effort to advance medical research. The agreement the researchers with leading-edge technologies, which will drive research capabilities and further the understanding of complex disease. The technologies, including the latest generation microarray systems from Roche NimbleGen, high-throughput screening instruments, genetic expression profilers and exome sequencing technologies will provide scientists with the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA and UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center with valuable technology directly from Roche’s research and development pipeline.

  • The Benefits of 'Perceptual Learning'

    New York Times - June 6, 2011
    An article in today’s New York Times about perceptual learning, which relies largely on gut-instinct, cites studies by UCLA researchers and colleagues in which school students were asked to solve mathematical problems that often required more intuition than mathematical knowledge. Philip J. Kellman, UCLA professor of cognitive psychology, is quoted.

  • Again, but faster! The spectacular courtship dance of a tiny bird

    UCLA Newsroom - June 02, 2011
    Julia Barske, a UCLA graduate student and doctoral candidate in ecology and evolutionary biology, has recently published data that shows that the females select the males that completed elements of the courtship dance in 50 milliseconds over the males that took 80 milliseconds. Barney Schlinger, professor and departmental chair of integrative biology and physiology and a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology is co-author of the study.

  • Why Less Attractive Men Make Better Mates

    June 20, 2011 - MSN Blog
    An MSN blog on Monday highlighted a study by UCLA researchers and colleagues suggesting that for women, dating a less attractive man may result in a happier, more emotionally satisfying relationship. Benjamin Karney, UCLA associate professor of psychology, was quoted.

  • Teens, Brains and Stress

    India Express - June 22, 2011
    Adriana Galvan, assistant professor of developmental psychology, has recently found that the brains of teens and adults react differently under stress and when dealing with risky situations. Galvan is quoted.

  • Wolves Are Wolf-Coyote Hybrids

    Boston Globe - May 31, 2011
    The Boston Globe reported on genetic research by Robert Wayne, UCLA professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, and colleagues indicating that wolves in the eastern U.S. are hybrids of gray wolves and coyotes and that eastern coyotes are wolf-coyote-dog hybrids.

  • The healing power of hydrogen peroxide

    Eurekalert - May 24, 2011
    Alvaro Sagasti, UCLA Professor of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, and UCLA postdoctoral scholar Sandra Rieger found that hydrogen peroxide, which is found in high concentrations in wounds, promotes the regeneration of sensory fibers in healing skin.

  • How to tell when someone's lying

    UCLA Newsroom - May 09, 2011
    UCLA professor of psychology R. Edward Geiselman and three former UCLA undergraduates have analyzed some 60 studies on detecting deception and conducted original research on the subject. They present their findings and their guidance for how to conduct effective training programs for detecting deception to help law enforcement agencies tell truth from lies.

  • UCLA Life Sciences Assistant professor William Lowry is awarded over a million dollars for stem cell research

    UCLA Health & Medicine News - May 05, 2011

  • Six UCLA stem cell scientists awarded more than $8 million in state grants

    UCLA Health & Medicine News - May 05, 2011
    Six scientists with the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA were awarded more than $8 million in grants from California's state stem cell agency on May 3 to investigate basic mechanisms underlying stem cell biology and differentiation. Shuo Lin ($1,382,400) Professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology in the UCLA Division of Life Sciences; and William Lowry ($1,354,230)Assistant professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology in the UCLA Division of Life Sciences

  • New Book: The Failure of Environmental Education– And How We Can Fix It

    May 16, 2011 - UCLA Newsroom
    This week, conservationist Charles Saylan and UCLA Professor and Chair of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Daniel T. Blumstein published their latest book, "The Failure of Environmental Education (And How We Can Fix It)." Sayan and Blumstein argue that schools must revamp how they teach about the environment to prevent ecological collapse.

  • Improving the Science of Teaching Science

    5/12/2011 - New York Times
    James Stigler, UCLA Professor and Chair of Developmental Psychology, quoted in the New York Times about his research aimed at improving science instruction in schools.

  • Are we outsourcing our brains to technology?

    May 18, 2011 - New York Times Magazine
    Robert Bjork distinguished professor of psychology and co-principal investigator at the Bjork Learning and Forgetting Lab at UCLA, was quoted Wednesday in a New York Times Magazine column about the effects of computers and Internet technology on human memory.

  • Electrode Experiment Shows Promise as a Paralyzed Man Stands

    Science Magazine - 5/19/11
    V. Reggie Edgerton, UCLA Professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology, and Susan Harkema of the University of Louisville in Kentucky, describe a new electrode experiment that helped a paralyzed man take steps on a treadmill, and regain other key functions. These studies may provide good hope for the quarter of a million Americans who are currently living with spinal cord injuries.

  • Species extinction rates may be overestimated

    UCLA Newsroom - 5/18/11
    Stephen Hubbell, UCLA distinguished professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, is co-author on a new study published May 19 in the journal Nature. The study found that methods most widely used for calculating species extinction rates are "fundamentally flawed" and overestimate extinction rates by as much as 160 percent.

  • Life Sciences Professor Steven E. Jacobsen elected to the National Academy of Sciences

    UCLA Newsroom - 5/3/11
    Steven E. Jacobsen, UCLA professor in the Department of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator was elected be a member of The National Academy of Sciences. Election to the Academy is considered one of the highest honors that can be accorded a scientist or engineer.

  • Can Traumatic Memories Be Erased?

    UCLA Newsroom - 4/27/11
    Could veterans of war, rape victims and other people who have seen horrific crimes someday have the traumatic memories that haunt them weakened in their brains? In a new study, David Glanzman, UCLA professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology, and his colleagues report a discovery that may make the reduction of such memories a reality.

  • Scientists Engineer Nanoscale Vaults to Encapsulate 'Nanodisks' for Better Drug Delivery

    UCLA Newsroom - 4/20/11
    A UCLA research team led by Leonard H. Rome and including Daniel B. Toso and Z. Hong Zhou from the UCLA Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, have developed a new and potentially far more effective means of targeted drug delivery using nanotechnology.

  • UCLA Study Identifies Cell of Origin for Squamous Cell Cancer

    The Examiner - 4/20/11
    This recent study on squamous cell cancers by Andrew White, postdoctoral fellow, and William Lowry, assistant professor, in the Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, could result in new strategies to treat and potentially prevent the disease.

  • Life Sciences Prof. Jeffrey H. Miller elected a Fellow at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    4/19/11 - UCLA Newsroom
    Life Sciences professor Jeffrey H. Miller was today elected a Fellow of the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Previous Fellows have included George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill.

  • Come On, I Thought I Knew That!

    New York Times - 4/18/11
    Robert Bjork, distinguished professor of psychology and co-principal investigator at the Bjork Learning and Forgetting Lab at UCLA, was quoted on Monday in a New York Times article on new research about how we learn and remember.

  • A Way To Fight the AIDS Virus With A Virus

    3/24/11 - Discovery News
    A study co-authored by James Lloyd-Smith, UCLA assistant professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and U.C. San Diego biochemist Leor Weinberger found that, over 30 years, therapeutic interfering particles (TIPS) could reduce the number of people in Sub-Saharan Africa infected with HIV to one-thirtieth of the current level.

  • Think You’ll Ace That Test? Think Again. Then Start Studying.

    3/24/11 - U.S. News
    U.S. News & World reports on research by Alan Castel, UCLA assistant professor of cognitive psychology, and colleagues exploring the dynamics between memory and emotional states.

  • Could You Find Love With Your Look-Alike?

    3/24/11 - ABC News online
    Kerri Johnson, UCLA assistant professor of communication studies and psychology, was quoted in an ABC News online article about a dating website that matches couples based on their facial similarities.

  • In Split Seconds, Your Vision Can Change Where You Hear Sound

    3/24/11 - Science Daily
    Ladan Shams, UCLA assistant professor of Psychology, recently published a study of how brain corrects perceptual errors. These findings may lead to better hearing aids and robotic technology.

  • Wired for Distraction: Kids and Social Media

    3/19/11 - Time Magazine Online
    This Time magazine article about kids and social media referenced a 2006 study at UCLA by Barbara Knowlton, UCLA professor of psychology, and her colleague, Russell Poldrack, now at the University of Texas at Austin.

  • Nanodiamonds Fight Cancer

    3/14/11 - Chemical and Engineering News
    Fuyu Tamanoi, UCLA professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics and director of the signal transduction and therapeutics program at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, was quoted Monday in a Chemical and Engineering News article about the use of diamond-like nanostructures in chemotherapy drug delivery.

  • White House Anti-Bullying Conference: Don’t Sit Back, Speak Up

    3/11/11 - LA Times
    Jaana Juvonen UCLA professor of developmental psychology, was quoted Thursday in a Los Angeles Times article about an anti-bullying conference at the White House.

  • Female GIs struggle with higher rate of divorce

    3/8/11 - Daily News
    Benjamin Karney, UCLA associate professor of psychology, is quoted today in this article about research showing that married women in the military are more than twice as likely as their male counterparts to get divorced.

  • Body language: Anger read as masculine

    3/6/11 - United Press International
    United Press International reported Sunday on a study led by Kerri Johnson, UCLA assistant professor of communication studies and psychology, that found that body language is more likely to be judged as masculine when it seems to convey anger and as feminine when is seems to convey sadness.